Courses and Course Descriptions

 

INSIDE WIREMAN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

CORE APPRENTICESHIP COURSES

1st YEAR

TECHNICAL MATHEMATICS: (SUMMER)

This comprehensive course provides a review of necessary mathematical skills for persons working in various trades and is crucial to the electrical trade. Topics include operations with whole numbers, integers, fractions, decimals, and ratios. More advanced topics include exponents, geometry, trigonometry, linear equations and vectors. The essentials of algebra, including solving equations and inequalities are also covered. This course is a requirement for anyone that received a Compass Test result below Math 100 (i.e. DEV 031).

Prerequisite: None

LENGTH: 8 weeks (16 nights)

CONDUIT BENDING (AUTUMN SEMESTER)

First year students begin their studies with a complete overview of conduit bending procedures and methods. This course will provide complete coverage of hand bending tools, conduit types, conduit layout, mechanical benders, conduit threading techniques, threading tools and procedures. Students will learn how to fabricate 90 degree stubs, offsets, kicks, and progress to 3 and 4 bend saddles.

Prerequisite:  Tech Math or Math 100 or higher

WIRING APPLICATIONS: (AUTUMN SEMESTER)

First year students continue their studies with an introduction to job related skills that focus on installation techniques, safety, and on the job activities. The course exposes students to common materials and equipment typically found on a commercial or industrial work site. Students are required to understand raceway and wiring installation aspects such as codes, safety and industry practices through the use of lectures and hands-on labs.

Prerequisite: None

INDUSTRY SURVEY: (SPRING SEMESTER)

This course provides students with an industry overview that focuses on apprentice responsibilities, industry structure, safety, and on the job activities. This course introduces students to the IBEW and its history, the structure of NECA, ladder safety, apprentice responsibilities, and basic electrical safety. Students are exposed to a variety of industry specific topics and finish their studies with CPR and First Aid.

Prerequisite: None

DC THEORY (SPRING SEMESTER)

First year students are introduced to the fundamentals of DC circuits and the application of mathematical principles to elementary electrical problems. This course begins with an overview electrical theory and continues with the elementary physics of resistors and how they interact in DC series and parallel circuits. More advanced topics include combination circuits, voltage dividers, superposition and Kirchoff’s Laws. Students must complete in-class and homework assignments that require correct answers and mathematical proof.

Prerequisite: Tech Math or Math 100 or higher

2nd Year

AC THEORY (AUTUMN SEMESTER)

Second year studentsbegin their electrical theory studies with an introduction to Alternating Current (AC) theory. This course begins with a review of electromagnetic theory and a comparison of AC to DC circuit parameters. The course proceeds with the elementary physics of inductors, capacitors and resistors and how they interact in AC circuits. More advanced topics include impedance, resonance and power factor calculations. Students must complete in-class and homework assignments that require correct answers and mathematical proof.

Prerequisite: Completion of first year inside curriculum.

TRANSFORMERS (AUTUMN SEMESTER)

Second year students continue their electrical theory studies with a comprehensive overview to transformer design and practical applications. This course begins with a review of electromagnetic theory inductive AC characteristics. The course continues with the theory and application of three-phase transformer connections. Students must complete in-class and homework assignments that require correct answers and mathematical proof.

Prerequisite: Completion of first year inside curriculum.

CODEOLOGY AND CALCULATIONS (SPRING SEMESTER)

Second year students begin their studies with a comprehensive overview of the National Electric Code (NEC). This overview begins with an introduction to “codeology”, a systematic study of the meaning and structure of the NEC. The course continues with exposure to code sections that pertain to commercial and industrial applications. More advanced topics include load calculations and other math related tasks associated with the electrical construction industry. Students must complete in-class and homework assignments that require correct answers and code sections.

Prerequisite: Completion of first year inside curriculum

CONSTRUCTION DRAWINGS (AUTUMN SEMESTER)

Second year students continue their electrical theory studies with a comprehensive overview of construction blueprints. Students begin by learning how to draw and recognize common scales and symbols for residential and commercial environments. Students will learn how to identify what and where material, fixtures and equipment will be installed prior to the start of a project. More advanced topics include understanding other crafts drawings, surveying and excavations.

Prerequisite: Completion of first year inside curriculum

3rd Year

SEMICONDUCTORS: (AUTUMN SEMESTER)

Third year students begin with an overview of electronics. This course provides the backbone necessary to understand nearly all electronic devices from transistors and amplifiers to communications systems. Topics include semiconductors, diodes, rectifiers, power supplies, bridge circuits, transistors, JFETs, MOSFETs and amplifiers. Students are introduced to power supplies, switched mode power supplies and solid state devices.Students also learn to solder in hands-on labs using pre-packaged electronics kits.

Prerequisite: Completion of second year inside curriculum

FIRE ALARM SYSTEMS: (AUTUMN SEMESTER)

Third year students continue their studies withfire alarm systems. This course begins with the importance of FA systems and then works to develop an understanding of the state of the art technology available today. Students will learn fire protection system types, power supplies, monitoring for integrity and wiring. This course is a preparatory class for the State of Ohio Fire Alarm Installer examination.Students will be required to obtain their State of Ohio Fire Alarm Installer License to proceed to the fourth year of studies.

Prerequisite: Completion of Semiconductors

GROUNDING AND BONDING: (SPRING SEMESTER)

Third year students examine grounding and bonding requirements for industrial and commercial electrical installations. Using a combination of lessons, National Electric Code sections and labs, students explore all facets of grounding and bonding AC and DC circuits. Students are introduced to a variety of real world applications requiring a fundamental understanding of electrical theory, codes and electrical installation practices. Topics include grounding requirements for AC and DC systems, service equipment, ground faults and testing.

Prerequisite:Completion of second year inside curriculum

OVERCURRENT PROTECTION: (SPRING SEMESTER)

Third Year students complete their studies with a comprehensive look at overcurrent protection for systems less than 600V. Topics include purpose of overcurrent protection, types of overcurrent,short circuits, device ratings, categories, . More advanced topics include selective coordination, tap rules, calculations of bolted fault currents and motor branch circuits, and transformer protection. Students will use previous skills from the grounding and bonding lessons, students will apply their code knowledge to practical field applications.

Prerequisite: Completion of grounding and bonding

4th Year

CONSTRUCTION AND ELECTRICAL SAFETY: (AUTUMN SEMESTER)

Fourth Yearstudents begin with a comprehensive overview of OSHA construction requirements. Students must complete the following safety courses: OSHA 30, NFPA 70e, CPR/First Aid, rigging and lifting, and confined space training. Students will learn to recognize and prevent general hazards associated with a construction site. Students will continue their studies examining electrical safety and the hazards associated with working on or near energized circuits. Additional topics include rigging, knot tying, crane signals, confined space requirements and safety.

Prerequisite: Completion of third year inside curriculum

MOTORS: (AUTUMN SEMESTER)

Fourth Yearstudentscontinue their studies with the theory, design, and installation of motors used in commercial and industrial locations. This course covers DC, AC, single-phase and three phase motors as well as bearings, braking, starting, motor alignments, variablespeed drives and drives systems. Students will learn how to trouble shoot motors and decide the appropriate course of action for Installation, replacement and/or repair.

Prerequisite: Completion of third year inside curriculum

MOTOR CONTROLS: (SPRING SEMESTER)

Motor control represents the capstone experience for ApprenticeInside Wireman. This course combines multimedia presentations, in-class demonstrations, group and individual hands-on projects along with extensive lessons to explore topics related to commercial and industrial motor control systems. Topics include: General principles; manual starters and magnetic coils; push buttons, selector switches, pilot devices, control relays and timers, basic two and three wire control circuits, schematic drawings and wiring diagrams, reversing and sequential control, jogging and plugging circuits, hand-off-auto controls, solid state and synchronous controls.

Prerequisite: Completion of third year inside curriculum

Back to Course Menu

 

JOURNEYMAN/ FIFTH YEAR ELECTIVES

AUTOCAD MEP (MECHANICAL, ELECTRICAL, PLUMBING)

This hands-on course is designed to enable the user to effectively use the AutoCAD MEP. Students will learn to draft, design, and document building systems with AutoCAD® MEP software, the version of AutoCAD® software for mechanical, electrical, and plumbing (MEP) designers and drafters.Upon completion of this course students will be able to work with the AutoCAD MEP interface to create and edit intelligent objects, learn the meaning of parametric design, BIM and object-oriented CAD, understand the drawing management features, how to share information with third party energy analysis programs, work with source drawings and source drawing queries, embed electrical power characteristics in electrical devices, place devices and assign load, place panels and create circuits and wires, convert AutoCAD geometry to AutoCAD MEP objects, understand the theory and applications of the AutoCAD MEP Style Manager, use the drawing compare and interference detection tools.

Prerequisite:  must pass basic computing skills test& Construction Drawings

Length: 16 weeks (32 nights)

BICSI INSTALLER LEVEL 2 COPPER- (STRUCTURED WIRING)

This entry level course sets the foundation of a copper-based structured cabling system installation. The course begins with an overview of copper transmission principles, professionalism, life safety and general industry best practices, as related to copper. A significant amount of course time will then be spent on BICSI best practices for the installation, termination, testing and retrofitting of copper cable. Additional topics covered will include BICSI best practices for pathways and spaces; grounding, bonding and protection; and firestopping.

Prerequisite: Individuals preparing to sit for the BICSI ITS Installer 2, Copper exam must possess at least one year of current and verifiable Information Technology Systems industry installation experience.

Length: 8 weeks (16 nights)

BICSI INSTALLER LEVEL 2 FIBER OPTICS

This entry level course is setting the groundwork for optical fiber-based structured cabling system installation. The course will open with an overview of fiber transmission principles, professionalism, life safety and industry best practices, as related to fiber. A significant amount of course time will then be spent on installation, splicing, termination, testing and retrofitting of optical fiber cable. Additional topics covered will include pathways and spaces, firestopping and an introduction to field coordination

Prerequisite:  Individuals preparing to sit for the BICSI ITS Installer 2, Fiber exam must possess at least one year of current and verifiable Information Technology Systems industry installation experience.

Length: 8 weeks (16 nights)

BUILDING SYSTEMS INTEGRATION/ ENERGY EFFICIENCY

This course is a must for all electricians who wish to learn how to install and designbuilding automation systems. This course starts byexamining HVAC, lighting, security, fire alarm, mechanical, plumbing systems. Students are then introduced to functions of sensors, actuators and other control devices. Students continue their studies exploring the integration of these systems in a sophisticated building automation environment. Finally, students learn about the most popular building automation system…LONWorks. Topics include defining the system architecture, selecting components, installing and configuring the network, optimizing network resources, and maintaining and documenting a finished network. The highlight of this course is the hands-on experience and job aids that will reduce the time required to commission aLONWorks network. This course will show you how to select the best components, devices, and architectures necessary to build open, interoperable LONWorks networks for building controls applications. This course provides practical, hands-on experience using simple examples, job aids, and network tools.

Prerequisite:  Completion of fourth year curriculum; students are required to pass a basic computing skills test

Length: 16 weeks (32 nights)

ELECTRICAL PROJECT SUPERVISION

This course is the designed to strengthen the abilities of project supervisors at all levels. Key topics include field supervision and crew management, technical skills, communication and “soft” skills, planning, managing risk, best practices for accomplishing project objectives, managing physical resources, schedules and costs, and team building.The course is designed for considerable interaction among participants, encouraging them to learn from one another. The course provides ample opportunities for large group and small group interactions, as well as practice of skills important to the supervisor.

Prerequisite:  Completion of second year curriculum

Length: 8 weeks (16 nights)

INDUSTRIAL AUTOMATION

This course combines lecture and hands-on labs to provide comprehensive coverage of motor controls, Programmable Logic Controllers and Variable Frequency Drives with control devices used in industrial and commercial electrical systems.  Topics include:  Electrical Symbols and Line Diagrams; Logic Applied to Ladder Diagrams, Variable Frequency Drives, Programmable Logic Controllers, AC/DC Magnetic Contactors and Motor Starters, Control Devices, Time Delay and Logic, Reversing Motor Circuits, Photoelectric and Proximity Controls, Preventive Maintenance and Troubleshooting.

Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Motor Controls; Students will be required to pass basic computing skills test

Length: 16 weeks (32 nights)

INSTRUMENTATION

This course that provides training in the skills required to install and calibrate instruments used for process control applications. Students begin their studies with an introduction to the basics of instrumentation, including definitions of commonly used terms and symbols, and an overview of the physical parameters of industrial measurement and control, pressure, flow, level, and temperature. This course also covers more complex materials such as configuration and calibration. It finishes with fundamentals of process control, control valves and control valve maintenance, analytical instrumentation, and instrument installation and tubing. A comprehensive lab is available for hands-on training which makes this course the best available for electrical workers.

Prerequisite:  Completion of Motor Controls

Length: 8 Weeks (16 nights)

PHOTOVOLTAICS

This course covers fundamentals of PV systems, equipment, and code-compliant installation requirements for residential and commercial installations. Topics include site evaluations, component operation, system design and sizing, installation requirements and recommended practices.The course format includes classroom instruction and hands-on interactive lab exercises using state of the art equipment and materials. Sample lab exercises cover variations on equipment and procedures that are used to meet learning objectives. Emphasis is also placed on how to achieve nationally recognized credentials.

Prerequisite: Completion of second year inside curriculum

Length: 8 weeks (16 nights)

PROGRAMMABLE LOGIC CONTROLLERS

This course builds on motor control skills by introducing computerized automated systems to students.  Topics include: Programmable controller basics, Numbering systems, Programmable controller operation, Input and Output modules, Installing PLC systems, Logic and Ladder logic programming, Processors and data organization, Relay logic instructions, Timers and counters, Data manipulation and control, Sequencers and shift registers,documenting PLC systems,use of  Allen Bradley PLCs running the latest version of Rockwell Automation’s control software,  DOS filtering and tree structure, Slot addressing options, Physical systems layout, Device addressing, Use of activation files, online/offline programming modes, use of menus and screens, create ladder logic programs and processor to device communication. Know when and how to use forcing cross reference and program search, program documentation, editing existing programs and creating programs to solve real world scenarios.

Prerequisite:Completion of Motor Controls;must pass basic computing skills test

Length: 8 weeks (16 nights)

WELDING I

This course introduces the learner to the welding skills, welding tools, welding safety, OxyFuel setup, cutting, and heating, base metal preparation, weld quality, and all aspects of Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) (known as “Stick Welding”) including equipment setup, and electrode selection. This course introduces the student to the process required to successfully join ferrous metals. The learner will engage in lab activities in OxyFuel cutting, plasma arc cutting and proper fit up and preparation of materials for joining.

Prerequisite:  none

Length: 8 Weeks (16 nights)

Back to Course Menu

 

JOURNEYMAN COURSES

CABLE SPLICING I

This is the first module of The Electrical Trades Center two module hands-on cable splicing course. This course will provide instruction in different types of cable, specialty tools and materials used in medium to high voltage work (typically 2,000 – 35,000 volts). Cable end preparation is covered and general safety practices will be discussed. This is a hands on course and all participants will construct several hand taped 5KV and 15 KV splices and terminations. Materials are presented from many different manufacturers of cable splicing materials.

Prerequisite:  Journeyman Wireman

Length: 8 Weeks (16 nights)

CABLE SPLICING II

This is the second module of The Electrical Trades Center two module hands-on cable splicing course. This course introduces students to several methods of terminating cable, Tee splices, and protective grounds. This course expands on the information the student learned and practiced in Module I. The hands-on exercises include construction of a 5KV and 15KV termination and 15KV Tee splice. Materials are presented from many different manufacturers of cable splicing materials.

Prerequisite:  Cable Splicing I

Length: 8 Weeks (16 nights)

ELECTRIC VEHICLE INFRASTRUCTURE TRAINING PROGRAM (EVITP)

EVITP is a national training and certification program that provides the EV industry with the highest level of verifiable knowledge and technical understanding to support the sound, safe and successful growth of the Electric Vehicle (EV) market. EVITP’s training content will incorporate and reflect the requirements, high standards and concerns of industry partners and stakeholders. EVITP is committed to establishing the nationally recognized standard in EV infrastructure training. Students will learn the technical requirements, safety imperatives and performance standards required to successfully install Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment.

Prerequisite:  Journeyman Wireman

Length: 4 Weeks (8 nights)

MOTOR CONTROLS

This course combines multimedia presentations, in-class demonstrations, group and individual hands-on projects along with extensive lessons to explore topics related to commercial and industrial motor control systems. Topics include: General principles; Manual starters and magnetic coils; Push buttons, selector switches, pilot devices, Control relays and timers, Basic two and three wire control circuits, Schematic drawings and wiring diagrams, Reversing and sequential control, Jogging and plugging circuits, Hand-Off-Auto controls, Solid state and synchronous controls.

Prerequisite:  Completion of Third Year Curriculum

Length: 16 weeks (32 nights)

NFPA 70e- ELECTRICAL SAFE WORK PRACTICES

In this course, electrical workers examine electrical safety related work practice requirements for industrial and commercial electrical installations. Using a combination of lessons, NFPA 70e and OSHA sections and labs, students explore all facets of electrical safety related work practices. Students are introduced to a variety of real world applications requiring a fundamental understanding of electrical theory, codes, safety, and installation practices. Topics include electrical safety culture, hazard awareness, NFPA 70e concepts, training requirements, working on or near live parts, approach boundaries, PPE selection, short circuit calculations and implementation.

Prerequisite:  Completion of AC Theory

Length: 2 nights (6 hours)

OSHA 10 HOUR

The course introduces students to the Occupational Health and Safety Act This training program is intended to provide entry level construction workers information about their rights, employer responsibilities, and how to file a complaint as well as how to identify, abate, avoid and prevent job related hazards on a construction site. The training covers a variety of construction safety and health hazards which a worker may encounter at a construction site. Training emphasizes hazard identification, avoidance, control and prevention, not OSHA standards. Students are exposed to a variety of safety related topics including OSHA policies and the Focus Four (Falls, Electrocutions, Caught Between and Struck-By).Additional topics include Cranes, Derricks, Hoists, Elevators, & Conveyors, Excavations,  Materials Handling, Storage, Use and Disposal, Scaffolds, Stairways and Ladders, Tools - Hand and Power.

Prerequisite:  none

Length: 3 nights

OSHA 30 HOUR

The course continues the study of the Occupational Health and Safety Act and its impact on loss prevention at construction sites. The training covers a variety of construction safety and health hazards which a worker may encounter at a construction site. Students are exposed to a variety of safety related topics including OSHA policies and the Focus Four (Falls, Electrocutions, Caught Between and Struck- By).  Additional topics include, Cranes, Derricks, Hoists, Elevators, & Conveyors, Ergonomics, Excavations, Fire Protection and Prevention, Materials Handling, Storage, Use and Disposal, Motor Vehicles, Mechanized Equipment ,Rollover Protective Structures and Overhead Protection, Signs,Signals and Barricades, Powered Industrial Vehicles, Safety and Health Programs, Scaffolds, Tools - Hand and Power, Welding and Cutting,

Prerequisite:  none

Length: 10 nights

SIGNIFICANT CHANGES TO THE NEC (OCILB AND OBBS CREDIT)

This extensive and popular program analyzes the major changes to the NEC. This is an invaluable resource for electricians, contractors, and inspectors, focusing on the most important changes that occurred between the 2008 and 2011 NEC. This course will reflect the newest installation practices utilized by the electrical industry.  This course is now offered in three- 10 hour sections: A,B, and C.

Prerequisite:  Journeyman Wireman

Length: 3 nights (10 hours)

WELDING II

This course introduces the learner to additional welding symbols and drawings, all aspects of Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) (known as MIG Welding) and TIG welding process,  including equipment set-up, gas selection, usage of both solid core and flux core welding wire, using both fillet and multiple-pass welds. This course introduces students to the process required to successfully join nonferrous metals. The learner will engage in lab projects joining metals in lap, tee, butt, and V-groove fit up using shielded and flux core MIG and TIG methods and materials.

Prerequisite:  Welding I

Length: 8 Weeks (16 nights)

Back to Course Menu

 

Opportunities     Programs     Application      Course Calendar      Course Description      ETC Bulletin      Degree Options      Partners      Contact      Home